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" He thinks in a peculiar train, and he thinks always as a man of genius; he looks round on Nature and on Life with the eye which Nature bestows only on a poet... "
Boswell's Life of Johnson: Including Boswell's Journal of a Tour of the ... - Page 524
by James Boswell - 1799
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The Lives of the Most Celebrated English Poets, with Criticisms. Extracted ...

Samuel Johnson - 1805 - 312 pages
...numbers, his pauses, his diction, are of his own growth, without transcription, without imitation. He thinks in a peculiar train, and he thinks always as a man of genius; he iooks round on nature and on life with the eye which nature bestows only on a poet; the eye that distinguishes,...
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A Brief Retrospect of the Eighteenth Century: Part the First in ..., Volume 3

Samuel Miller - 1805
...diqtion, are of his own growth, without transcription, without imitation. He thinks in a peculiar strain ; and he thinks always as a man of genius. He looks round on nature and life with the eye which nature bestows only on a poet ; the eye that distinguishes in every thing presented...
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The British Essayists;: Lounger

Alexander Chalmers - 1807
...one praise of the highest kind ; his mode of thinking and of expressing his thoughts, is original. He thinks in a peculiar train, and he thinks always as...round on nature and on life with the eye which Nature feestows only on a poet ; the eye that distinguishes, in every thing presented to its view, whatever...
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The British Essayists, Volume 36

Alexander Chalmers - 1807
...life with the eye which Nature bestows only on a poet ; the eye that distinguishes, in every thing presented to its view, whatever there is on which...can delight to be detained, and with a mind that at ontfe comprehends the vast, and attends to the minute. The reader of the Season* wonders that he never...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volume 2

Hugh Blair - 1807
...number*, his pauses, his diction, are of his own growth, without transcription, without imitation. He thinks in a peculiar train, and he thinks always as a man of genius. He looks round on nature and life, with the eye which nature bestows nniy on a. poet ; the eye that distinguishes in every thing...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volume 3

Hugh Blair - 1809
...the eye " which nature beftows only on a Poet; the eye that diftinguimes *' in every thing prefehted to its view, whatever there is on which " imagination...; and with a mind, that " at once comprehends the vail and attends to the minute. The " Reader of the Seafo'ns wonders that he never faw before what...
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The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper: Including ..., Volume 12

Samuel Johnson - 1810 - 526 pages
...numbers, his pauses, his diction, are of his own growth, without transcription, with- mi imitation. He thinks in a peculiar train, and he thinks always as...bestows only on a poet; the eye that distinguishes, in every thing presented to its view, whatever there is on which imagination can delight to be detained,...
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The lives of the English poets

Samuel Johnson - 1810
...numbers, his pauses, his diction, are of his own growth, without transcription, without imitation. He thinks in a peculiar train, and he thinks always as...bestows only on a poet ; the eye that distinguishes, in every thing presented to its view, whatever there is on which imagination can delight to be detained,...
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Prior. Congreve. Blackmore. Fenton. Gay. Granville. Yalden. Tickell. Hammond ...

Samuel Johnson - 1810
...numbers, his pauses, his diction, are of his own growth, without transcription, without imitation. He thinks in a peculiar train, and he thinks always as...bestows only on a poet ; the eye that distinguishes, in every thing presented to its view, whatever there is on which imagination can delight to be detained,...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, Volume 11

Samuel Johnson - 1810
...numbers, his pauses, his diction, are of hisown growth, without transcription, without imitation. He thinks in a peculiar train, and he thinks always as...bestows only on a poet ; the eye that distinguishes, in every thing presented to its view, whatever there is 0*1 which imagination can delight to be detained,...
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