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" HAD rather believe all the fables in the legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind: and, therefore, God never wrought miracles to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. "
Essays, Moral, Economical, and Political - Page 82
by Francis Bacon - 1812 - 295 pages
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The American National Preacher, Volumes 27-30

1853
...they became fools." ROMANS L 22. " I had rather," says Lord Bacon, " believe all the fables of the Legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind." This sentence, from the pen of the grent philosopher, is a very good practical commentary upon my text,...
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Christian Examiner, Volume 7; Volume 12

1832
...express what history proves to have been the common and spontaneous feeling of man, when he said, ' I had rather believe all the fables in the Legend,...than that this universal frame is without a mind.' Can we, then, suppose that a sentiment, which thus manifests itself to be one of the elements wrought...
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The American Library of Useful Knowledge, Volume 4

1832
...he was shrewdly suspected of favoring atheism, who had eloquently published to the world, " I would rather believe all the fables in the Legend, and the...than that this universal frame is without a mind." We should have supposed that any kind of tendency to irreligion would have been the very last thing...
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The Tourist: A Literary and Anti-slavery Journal, Volume 1

1833
...piece had been acted in our theatre, by Mr. Southwell's excellent company of performers." APHORISMS. God never wrought miracles to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. LORD BACON. The misfortunes which arise from the concurrence of unhappy incidents should never be suffered...
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The authenticity of the Bible

Origen Bacheler - 1833
...Christian religion. " I had rather," says 'he, " believe all the fables in the Legend, the Tahnud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind. God never wrought a miracle to convert aj^ Atheist, because his ordinary works confute him. A thorough...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 16, Issue 2

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1834
...through his only son Immanuel." (а) The evidence of this may be found in the preface to vol. vii. the fables in the Legend and the Talmud and the Alcoran,...than that this universal frame is without a mind." (a) As knowledge consists in understanding the sequence of events, or cause and effect, (6) he knew...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: A New Edition:

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1834
...little credit with him, when he thus began one of his essays, ' I had rather believe all the rabies in the Legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind.' " I have a copy of this edition. A Letter of the Lord Bacon's, in French, to the Marquess Fiat, relating...
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Helps to the Study of Presbyterianism: Or, An Unsophisticated Exposition of ...

William Gannaway Brownlow - 1834 - 299 pages
...digest them, need not dread to encounter iron, adamant fish-hooks, and glassbottles! I could sooner believe all the fables in the legend, and the Talmud, and the Koran, than that the doctrine of Calvinism has any foundation in truth. I will here add the views of...
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Character of Lord Bacon: His Life and Work ...

Thomas Martin - 1835 - 367 pages
...moves round its own axis ; * and even Bacon himself he who had nobly and eloquently said, that ' / had rather believe all the fables in the Legend, and...than that this universal frame is without a mind,'-\- escaped not the bigoted attacks of the school-divines, who attempted to cry down his philosophical...
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American Quarterly Review, Volume 19

Robert Walsh - 1836
...doubted, or to have satisfied themselves early. " I had rather believe all the fables in the legend, in the Talmud and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind." And the mind that dictated these words is sufficient in itself to establish the belief in a God. Its own...
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